What is ALS

About ALS

What is ALS

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or ALS, is a nervous system (neurological) disease that causes muscle weakness and impacts physical function. ALS is often called Lou Gehrig’s disease, named after the famous baseball player who was diagnosed with it. ALS is a type of motor neuron disease that causes nerve cells to gradually break down and die. In the United States, ALS is sometimes called “motor neuron disease.” In most cases, doctors do not know why ALS occurs. A small number of cases are perhaps inherited. ALS often begins with muscle twitching and weakness in an arm or leg, or sometimes with slurring of speech. Eventually, ALS can affect your ability to control the muscles you need to move, speak, eat, and breathe. ALS cannot be cured, and it eventually leads to death, typically within two to five years of diagnosis.


*Sourced from Mayo Clinic Report 

*credit to ALS foundation of life